Stop that key-reminder noise and lose 6 [edit: 8] lbs fast!

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kiev

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That annoying dinging sound when you open a door when the key is in the switch!
[edit: added pictures here, leg-slicer

Sometimes i have to load or unload with the doors open for extended time, and i want to leave the key in the ignition (so i know where it is and don't have to look for it), and i want the radio on to hear music while i work, and i'm getting sick and tired of hearing that constant dinging .

1. Remove two philips head screws holding lower knee panel to get it out of the way.

2. Bonus (US version) step: remove the two razor-sharp unpainted steel knee-cutter brackets using deep-well 12mm socket (removes 6 lbs of dangerous weight that would slice your legs open in a wreck). [aka anti-submarine brackets]

EDIT: i was removing the glovebox to get to the air filter to clean it, and noticed that there is a pair of knee-cutters for the passenger as well--removed 2 more lbs of useless weight...

3. Remove the two ph screws from the lower steering column cover, pry the cover loose starting at the key switch and swing the cover down and off.

4. Remove the two small ph screws holding the small plastic block to the front rim of the key switch at about the 2:00 position. The block has two green wires attached and a tiny plastic button. Press the plastic button to hear the annoying thing. Replace the screws in the lock rim.

5. Replace the covers and screws, enjoy peace and quiet with the doors open and key in the switch.
 
The wiring harness to the ignition switch can be seen if you are able to fit on the floor and look under the dash. Of the several wires, I'm sure one is the key-present signal.

Joe, for your OT peeve, simply turning the key to ACC is enough to put my cars in neutral. I haven't tried yet to see if charging stops or not. It will stop charging if you turn the key on and shift out of Park. If you just turn the key on and don't shift, it will keep charging.
 
kiev said:
That annoying dinging sound when you open a door when the key is in the switch!

Aaaahh peace and quiet . . . thanks mucho for the tips Kiev. I did locate the noise box itself but it is under a cover on the back side of the cabin fuse panel. Actually significantly harder to get to than the switch which Kiev gave great instructions on disabling. I also taped that switch to a nearby bracket with electrical tape to prevent it from being activated by vibration or something.

PV1 - It turns out that it is pretty easy to disable the key switch interlock to the shifter. I did so temporarily while getting rid of the "ding - ding - ding . . .". Opted to leave it stock before I closed the panels back up though. I don't find it that much of a pain (although I would rather not have it). But it is considered a safety interlock feature so best to have it working for liability reasons, if none other.


THOSE "BRACKETS" - I thought Kiev was just being flippant until saw them, Wow! Anyone who can come up with a plausible positive purpose for them I would love to hear some theories!

Aerowhatt
 
IMG_20150623_131538-300x225.jpg
 
kiev - thank you very much for pursuing this mod and posting the results, and Aerowhatt and PV1 thanks for your inputs. Really have to wonder about the function(s) of that bracketry, considering some of the weight-saving extremes that Mitsu had gone to with this car. Since we so often loan our i-MiEVs to others, I think I'll be limiting these types of mods to "my" car only (Mitti). :geek:
 
I've only been able to come up with one "plausible" reason for those brackets. Nothing is attached or mounted to them so they are there for their own purposes? Since they mimic the shape of the drivers side dash but none of the panels attach to them I'm thinking that they must be intended to provide resistance to a person not wearing a seatbelt from going completely under the dash and steering column in a front end collision. Pretty apparent an "after thought" type solution. Presumably the plastic kick panel, etc., would be sandwiched between the persons legs and the brackets reducing the "leg slicer" effect? That's all that I can imagine they might be about, I'm at a loss for other alternative explanations.

Interestingly there is nothing even remotely similar on the passenger side.

Other thoughts??

Aerowhatt
 
That's what it looks like they are. They seem to provide support to the plastic panel to prevent it from being caved in.

I use it to support my OVMS module.
 
PV1 said:
That's what it looks like they are. They seem to provide support to the plastic panel to prevent it from being caved in.

I agree, but why not just make them something that supports (attaches) those panels instead? depending whether one drives with their knees together or apart, vastly different outcomes would result by looking at the placement etc. At least so, in a crash scenario. As for just support, they have too much space between them and the plastic panel to prevent damage to the panels in some non crash related rough but incidental impact to the kick panel or adjacent plastic of the dash?

tigger19687 said:
so probably not a good idea to take it out then ?

IMO it depends. I don't see any positives to them if you are wearing a seat belt. And the usefulness of them is questionable if you are not wearing, one in my opinion. I guess it depends on what you prefer to injure and how much. They look like a Rube Goldberg "fix" to pass a specific crash test parameter. I think that they are likely to cause more harm than good to parts that I value highly (Knees for example) depending upon the impact dynamics. I always wear a seat belt and wear it properly (very important). So does my wife and I won't let anyone else drive it since it's too hard to replace it in this area. I'm choosing OUT, until further research into it proves to me that we are better off with them in.

Aerowhatt
 
They are a 'safety' feature required by uncle sam to prevent 'submarining' in a wreck, i.e. slipping out under the seatbelt and ending up under the dash.

I prefer to take the chance that my seatbelt and airbag will do their job versus the crippling effects of knee damage.

Just be careful and don't cut your fingers when removing them--the punched steel edges are razor sharp, no deburring was done and the edges and corners are brutal!

If i felt they were needed for some strange reason, then i might make some out of aluminum with strategic bends to create a crush zone to absorb energy--i doubt those steel brackets will bend much and the sharp edges will surely tear hell out of your leg and knee.
 
GR8 tips!!!
Member Aerowhatt wrote:
"Aaaahh peace and quiet"
Got my vote too.
Easy project and no knee injury just in case.
Thanks kiev
 
Well, I got my answer. I love the idea of weight reduction, however with the already moderate rear weight bias of approximately 150 pounds; I would seek to try and remove an even greater amount of weight from the rear. How that would be accomplished, I haven't the faintest idea. I have inspected the rear end and that is the thinnest steel I've come across in a car, in a long time.
 
Mievo said:
Well, I got my answer. I love the idea of weight reduction, however with the already moderate rear weight bias of approximately 150 pounds; I would seek to try and remove an even greater amount of weight from the rear. How that would be accomplished, I haven't the faintest idea. I have inspected the rear end and that is the thinnest steel I've come across in a car, in a long time.


E-truck

Carry your portable antigravity device in the storage box like I do :D

Aerowhatt
 
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