Sandrosan
Posts: 37
Joined: Tue Sep 24, 2019 2:43 am
Location: Milan, Italy

Re: Troubleshooting and repair for On-board Charger (OBC)

Tue Apr 27, 2021 3:27 am

@ Kiev,

I am sorry you could not see the image (a photo of my scretch, 4MB size) in that link. I uploaded it again and Wetransfer generates this link that will be active for one week:
https://we.tl/t-X76eNfvwQD

Yes the intermitted faults are difficult to trace.
Just now it is again under charging process at 14A and the 3 voltages are stable.... :cry:

kiev
Posts: 1608
Joined: Sun May 03, 2015 7:15 am
Location: The Heart o' Dixie
Contact: Website

Re: Troubleshooting and repair for On-board Charger (OBC)

Tue Apr 27, 2021 4:08 am

Can anyone else see the image? Not sure why, but the link takes me to a sign-up page to create an account and doesn't show the image.
kiev = kenny's innovative electric vehicle

coulomb
Posts: 297
Joined: Sun Jun 10, 2018 8:32 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Re: Troubleshooting and repair for On-board Charger (OBC)

Tue Apr 27, 2021 4:44 pm

kiev wrote:Can anyone else see the image?

I can download it on my phone. Haven't tried on the desktop yet.

iOnico
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed May 19, 2021 8:47 am
Location: Karlsruhe, Germany

Re: Troubleshooting and repair for On-board Charger (OBC)

Wed May 19, 2021 11:06 am

Hello everyone,

I’m joining this community with my broken OBC that is part of a Peugeot iOn from 2011. Thanks to the good documentation and large amount of information in this thread I was able to fix the blown snubber caps as well as the 20 A-fuse and, as a consequence, to get rid of the “red battery”- and “yellow car with exclamation mark”-warning lights on dash. My auxiliary battery is getting charged again jumping from 12.7 V to 14.4 V when the car is switched on and the “READY”-symbol appears. Also, the 20 A-fuse wasn't blown again when the car was started. So, I have the feeling to already have done a good part of the road to get the car completely fixed again and I can’t thank enough all the contributors to this thread who made this become possible.

Now I’m more or less at the same point where skylogger was in July 2018:
I ended up [...] replacing the two caps in the doghouse filter section, re-assemblied the whole thing and put back in the car. We replaced the 20amp fuse, filled up the coolant tank, and plugged back in the safety plug and connected up the 12v battery. Connected up the MUT III Analyser, and had two errors being reported concerning OBC and DC-DC. Ran the option to clear errors and re-test, and all errors were cleared. Checked the 12v battery before turning car on and voltage was about 12.3v. After turning the key and getting "READY" The Battery ICON and the HV fault Icons were no longer showing on the dash, and the 12v battery was now reading 14.4V so it appears to be charging. Connected the charging cord to the car and attempted to charge, but could see the charge light on dash blink, then the HV Fault came on the dash, then both went out.

Just like skylogger describes, when I put the AC-charger-plug into the car, the ventilation starts instantly for 2 or 3 seconds and on dash the “red plug”-symbol starts blinking. After 5 seconds the “yellow car with the exclamation mark”- symbol lights up. After another second the “yellow car with the exclamation mark”- symbol and the “red plug”-symbol turn durably off.

Back to skylogger’s case: In August 2018 had finally fixed the issue.
So I decided to bit the bullet, and re-install the charger back into the car and test it out.
Once I got through fitting it, I turned the key and car went to "READY" with no errors on Dash. I checked the 12v battery and could see it was sitting at 14.4v so it looked like it was charging ok, particularly since it was sitting for a week without a charge. I connected up the MUT III and scanned for errors. It not only listed the OBC Timeout Error and DC-DC Error from the previous time I turned on the car without the charger installed, but it also listed LIN errors for all of the CMUs which was a bit weird. I re-ran the DTC Scan with erasing all the errors first, and all errors were cleared. Then for the moment of truth, I turned off the car, plugged in the charge cable, and the charge Light lit up on the dash, cooling fan came on. and I could also hear the coolant pump circulating coolant. It was 5 bars down when I started, and after 20 minutes I could see that the fuel gauge had moved up one bar. So all is looking great so far.


As far as I see, from the documentation of the problem resolution that was posted in the meantime, two things could have caused his on-board-charging first to fail and then to work again:

One was a twisted resistor, due to which a circuit was open.
I was looking over the section on the bottom PCB next to CN1 Connector. I spotted a resistor that was a bit diagonal and when I checked from the pin of the IC to the VIA I found it was open. one side was not making contact to the pads.

I haven’t found a part obviously misplaced in my charger, but I have to admit that I haven’t checked that very thoroughly. So, I may need to get back into it again...

The other one was bad communication between the MUT III-clone he used and OBC, so that stored diagnostic codes may not have been erased from there.
I ran some test with MUT III. I could look at Hardware and Software revisions on BMU, CMU, MMU, But the MUT III would not communicate with the OBC. I only just tried this on two other working IMIEVs and have the same problem, so it looks like my problem with communications between MUT III and OBC are with the MUT III and not really a fault with the OBC. I'm using a MUT III Clone from china, and the MUT III Second Edition software that I acquired from Russia. I think the MUT III talks to all the ECUs on the same CANBUS, but the CANBUS That connects to the Diagnostic socket on the car is a different bus than what connects to the OBC.

I don’t have access to a MUT III, so I need to have the deletion of the stored diagnostic codes done at the Peugeot dealership. I have had stored diagnostic codes erased once already after having it made to the situation described in the beginning of this post, but it didn’t change anything on the charging behaviour. I haven’t assisted to that intervention at the dealership. So, this part of the process is kind of a black box for me: I don’t know the tool and I don’t know the process. Is it possible that a dealership has a tool (some alternative to the MUT III) that is not completely compatible with the car, so it wouldn’t be able to communicate with the OBC to erase stored diagnostic codes there? And, as a consequence, the remaining error codes would just trigger again the charging failure? Or can it happen that the user of the MUT III-alternative only erases a part of the diagnostic codes that would need to be erased (e.g. only the codes stored in one location), even if he could have access to the diagnostic codes stored in the OBC? Are there actually diagnostic codes stored in the OBC?
skylogger doesn’t get into details on which tool (the same as before?) he used in what manner (the same as before?) to clear the error codes on his final problem resolution.

So, that’s where I stand and the questions I have on my mind. Every help and input will be appreciated.
Nico

Sandrosan
Posts: 37
Joined: Tue Sep 24, 2019 2:43 am
Location: Milan, Italy

Re: Troubleshooting and repair for On-board Charger (OBC)

Thu May 20, 2021 2:12 am

Sandrosan wrote:@ Kiev,

I am sorry you could not see the image (a photo of my scretch, 4MB size) in that link. I uploaded it again and Wetransfer generates this link that will be active for one week:
https://we.tl/t-X76eNfvwQD

Yes the intermitted faults are difficult to trace.
Just now it is again under charging process at 14A and the 3 voltages are stable.... :cry:


Hi Kiev and all others,
Just to let you know that I think and hope I have fixed the problem making 2 jump wires: one directely from the +5V of C703 to the relay coil, and the other one from collector of TR301 and the other side of the relay coil. As the voltage directely on the coil was unstable, while the same voltage but from the + 5V of C703 and the collector of TR301 was stable. This means there was a bad contact on ribbon flat cable / its connectors / PCB traks. In my opinion to design a circuit which uses such ribbon flat cable for flowing some 50 / 70 mA necessary to the relay coil for so many hours during all the charging process was a sort of crime. Now the voltage directely on the coil is happily stable. :D
But to get it, belive me it took many days of data logging while charging process.

Sandrosan
Posts: 37
Joined: Tue Sep 24, 2019 2:43 am
Location: Milan, Italy

Re: Troubleshooting and repair for On-board Charger (OBC)

Thu May 20, 2021 2:14 am

Of course only time will tell me if it has been the definitive solution.

kiev
Posts: 1608
Joined: Sun May 03, 2015 7:15 am
Location: The Heart o' Dixie
Contact: Website

Re: Troubleshooting and repair for On-board Charger (OBC)

Thu May 20, 2021 5:26 am

@Sandrosan, That is great news to hear-- all your hard work has paid off. Thanks for sharing your results.

i agree that the flat ribbon cable with such tiny traces and connector terminals is a poor design. i've had problems with similar type ribbons in other devices.

For comparison, the Nissan Laef OBC is made by the same vendor but uses a much more rugged connector and wiring harness to connect between the upper control board and the lower power board.

Image
Last edited by kiev on Thu May 20, 2021 6:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
kiev = kenny's innovative electric vehicle

kiev
Posts: 1608
Joined: Sun May 03, 2015 7:15 am
Location: The Heart o' Dixie
Contact: Website

Re: Troubleshooting and repair for On-board Charger (OBC)

Thu May 20, 2021 5:59 am

@Nico

Welcome to the forum and glad you found some helpful information.

There are other areas of the OBC which can or have failed, but the 2 that you fixed are the most common. A reading of the stored DTCs would help determine what is the remaining issue.

The dealer's scan tool (MUT, Lexia, or Diagbox?) has all the capabilities and features to read and clear errors in all the control units, including the OBC, which does have its own set of simple codes.

Before clearing any codes, it would be good to get a reading of whatever codes are stored in order to have some idea where or what the problem might be. The DTCs and the simple OBC codes would help pinpoint which circuit might have issues.

The iCarSoft i909 scan tool may be an option for you to a low cost tool to read and clear DTCs. It is made for Mitsubishi and i don't know if it would work for the iOn, maybe someone else has tried and could let us know.
kiev = kenny's innovative electric vehicle

iOnico
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed May 19, 2021 8:47 am
Location: Karlsruhe, Germany

Re: Troubleshooting and repair for On-board Charger (OBC)

Thu May 20, 2021 10:57 am

Thanks for your welcome, Kenny, and for your quick response.

I found a statement in the speakev.com forum concerning the use of the iCarSoft i909 on the Peugeot iOn or the Citroen C-Zero:
The question asked was "Does the i909 work on the PSA pair of the triplets?"
No the i909 is Jap models only (Mazda and Mitsubishi). Despite it being the same car it refuses to work (probably vin range check or similar). I tried the PSA version of the icarsoft (i970) on an ion but it didnt work well, the dash lit up like a christmas tree and the car wasnt happy, didnt give any useful information. I dont know if it was trying to talk "Peugeot" to what is really a Mitsubishi. There are more advanced icarsoft models available, presume one of those would work better.


Ok, so I bury my hope that the ongoing issue was just due to an incomplete deletion of the diagnostic codes. Would have been too easy anyway... :roll:

Before replacing the snubber caps and the MCU fuse the scan of diagnostic codes in the EV_ECU at the dealership had brought up these ones:
- P0A09: DCDC converter (1)
- P1AF8: On board charging stop processing time-out
- U111D: On board charger CAN time-out
- U1113: "Ignore Fault code" or "Remote CAN T/O/ Not equip" (code isn't listed in the workshop manual so I took the interpretation from this post and this post)

Of course it would be much more interesting to have the new, fresh diagnostic codes, from after my intervention. I'll try to bring them here quickly. I'll see if I'll invest in a scan tool or if I'll have the codes read out at the garage around the corner. If someone could tell about a good experience with a scan tool on a Peugeot iOn, I would be interested to know more about that, particularly which tool was used, of course.

kiev
Posts: 1608
Joined: Sun May 03, 2015 7:15 am
Location: The Heart o' Dixie
Contact: Website

Diagnostic checks

Fri May 21, 2021 8:17 am

Without the codes it will be more difficult to pinpoint, i don't know if one of the phone apps thru an OBDII dongle will read DTCs if that is possible.

But how far into the sequence does the system go before shutting down? do you hear the relays and contactors clacking? Does charging attempt to start for a brief period, i.e. the EVSE relay closes and AC power is applied to the OBC? This might give some clues.

First of all, Did you do a diode check of the waffle plate junctions? If that is damaged then of course it won't work.

Were you careful when removing and reconnecting the flat ribbon cable between the control board and the power board? That is very critical and should be checked. What about the connector on the upper board, was that mated properly?

There are low voltage power supplies created on the upper control board

Did you check thru the AC input section of your OBC for damaged capacitors, the AC relay, or the ceramic resistors? Did you check the HV DC output fuse of the OBC? while we have never seen it blow there is always the first time. There are numerous components (resistors, capacitors, diodes) that can be measured while on the board to verify that they are okay

Otherwise it is possible to solder some jumper wires on the board and run them out of the box so you can verify that AC is getting to the waffle plate. Once that is confirmed then you can move thru the various sections.
kiev = kenny's innovative electric vehicle

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