JoeS
Site Moderator
Posts: 3423
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 5:47 am
Location: Los Altos Hills, California

Re: What tire would you recommend?

Fri Feb 02, 2018 11:06 am

Update on the new front Blizzaks and rear Enasaves:

As I was pushing the car a bit going down my windy road last night, the ASC kicked in prematurely :shock: keeping me from applying full throttle in the curve. Guess there must be a diameter mismatch between the Blizzaks and Enasaves which is recognized by the car. :cry: This is a noticeably more sensitive response than normal, as 'normally' this occurs when one is really throwing the car into the curve. Guess this will make my tires last longer :roll: (or I can disable ASC more often :evil: ).
EVs: 2 Wht/Blu SE Prem., '13 Tesla MS85, 3 156v CorbinSparrows (2 Li-ion), 24v EcoScoot(LiFePO4)
EV Conv: 156v '86 Ram PU, 144v '65 Saab 96
Hybrids: 48v1kW bike
ICE: '88 Isuzu Trooper. Mothballed: '67 Saab (orig.owner), '76 MBZ L206D RHD RV

rmay635703
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2014 5:23 pm

Re: What tire would you recommend?

Sun Feb 04, 2018 7:37 pm

165/65r14 re92’s roll the best

JoeS
Site Moderator
Posts: 3423
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 5:47 am
Location: Los Altos Hills, California

Re: What tire would you recommend?

Mon Feb 05, 2018 3:05 pm

rmay635703 wrote:165/65r14 re92’s roll the best
Sadly, those excellent Bridgestone Potenza ultra-low-rolling resistance tires used on the Gen1 Honda Insight do not fit the stock i-MiEV wheel rims.
EVs: 2 Wht/Blu SE Prem., '13 Tesla MS85, 3 156v CorbinSparrows (2 Li-ion), 24v EcoScoot(LiFePO4)
EV Conv: 156v '86 Ram PU, 144v '65 Saab 96
Hybrids: 48v1kW bike
ICE: '88 Isuzu Trooper. Mothballed: '67 Saab (orig.owner), '76 MBZ L206D RHD RV

JoeS
Site Moderator
Posts: 3423
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 5:47 am
Location: Los Altos Hills, California

Re: What tire would you recommend?

Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:10 pm

JoeS wrote:Update on the new front Blizzaks and rear Enasaves:
As I was pushing the car a bit going down my windy road last night, the ASC kicked in prematurely :shock: keeping me from applying full throttle in the curve. Guess there must be a diameter mismatch between the Blizzaks and Enasaves which is recognized by the car. :cry: This is a noticeably more sensitive response than normal, as 'normally' this occurs when one is really throwing the car into the curve. Guess this will make my tires last longer :roll: (or I can disable ASC more often :evil: ).
Hey, we had some rain and the front Blizzaks and rear Enasaves have done a nice job of maintaining traction.

Unfortunately, the mismatched tires are proving to be a hazard. Example: entering the freeway a few miles from my house, I have about 100-yard straight followed by a turn which merges with oncoming onramp traffic before merging with the freeway itself. Not a problem, as I simply floor it at the start of the straight stretch and am already at speed as I do the first merge still floored and then continue accelerating and finally merging with the freeway. The reason for needing the speed to the first curve is that the onramp traffic is already moving fast and accelerating. So, what's the problem? As I hit the first curve fully floored, with these mismatched tires ASC kicks in and results in noticeable slowing of the car - what would have been a nice clean merge with onramp traffic now results in my now-slowed car causing cars behind me to crowd up even though I have the go-pedal floored!. As the car recovers it now doesn't have the speed to nicely merge with the freeway traffic. Solution is simple: I just need to remember to disable ASC! Note that recovery from ASC actuation is not instantaneous.

Thanks for listening - I simply needed to vent, and perhaps a cautionary note to anyone wanting to install mismatched tires. :x

As an aside, with the Tesla I have the opposite problem: flooring it (force of habit) results in going waaaay too fast by the time I hit the first curve! :roll:
EVs: 2 Wht/Blu SE Prem., '13 Tesla MS85, 3 156v CorbinSparrows (2 Li-ion), 24v EcoScoot(LiFePO4)
EV Conv: 156v '86 Ram PU, 144v '65 Saab 96
Hybrids: 48v1kW bike
ICE: '88 Isuzu Trooper. Mothballed: '67 Saab (orig.owner), '76 MBZ L206D RHD RV

DBMandrake
Posts: 48
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2017 4:57 am
Location: Scotland

Re: What tire would you recommend?

Wed Apr 11, 2018 6:54 am

Thought I'd throw my 2c into the conversation as I too was faced with needing new tyres on my Ion last year, and contemplating the odd sizes it needs.

The tyres that came on the car were Hankook Kinergy Eco summer tyres, all were getting towards minimum tread, were starting to crack badly on the sidewalls (not a good sign!) and with winter coming I didn't want to be running summer tyres when I rely 100% on the car for the daily commute, and didn't want to try to source a second set of winter wheel rims so I decided to try some All Seasons to use all year round.

After a bit of research and enquiry I settled on the Vredestein Quatrac 5, which are one of the few affordable All Season tyres available in both sizes the car needs in the UK:

https://www.mytyres.co.uk/cgi-bin/rshop ... p=R-281206

https://www.mytyres.co.uk/cgi-bin/rshop ... p=R-281218

They've now been on the car about 6 months and 6k miles, barely show any signs of wearing in yet and performed admirably through the winter snow and ice. I never got stuck once and I was routinely passing stranded cars (presumably on summer tyres) in the severe snow we had recently in the UK. :D

Performance in warm dry weather is not as good as the summer tyres that were on the car before, but its close - I'd say dry summer grip is about 80-90% of the original summer tyres, I can notice the grip is less if the car is pushed hard but the difference is small.

I found increasing the tyre pressures to compensate for the softer tyre formulation helped a lot - the manufacturers recommended pressure is 36psi which was OK on the previous summer tyres however I have found that raising these to 40psi in warm weather makes the car feel and handle a lot better, and a lot closer to the summer tyres. In freezing conditions I found about 38 psi was optimal.

Performance in the wet is excellent especially cornering - I don't really notice any significant reduction in grip between dry and wet roads with the grip being very safe and predictable, whereas with the (admittedly worn) summer tyres the grip was better that these in the dry but considerably worse in the wet, so much so that putting your foot down on a wet roundabout invariably caused the rear end to let go and the traction control to go into overdrive to prevent a tailspin - on these tyres there is barely a complaint from the tyres on the same wet roundabout with foot down, with only very mild and controllable oversteer. I put this down to the tyre having a lot of sipes compared to a summer tyre so it is able to clear even deep standing water easily.

So if anyone wants a good all year round tyre that will cope well with a UK winter but still be good enough in summer, I can recommend these, and at £60 each (£55 when I bought mine last year) they are reasonably priced too.

All I would suggest is to run them at higher than normal pressure - around 38-40 psi seems to be optimal, and makes them feel a lot better in summer.

As for "low rolling resistance" - they are not specifically sold as a low rolling resistance tyre, but they actually get a C energy rating on the EU scale, compared to the E rating for the Hankook Kinergy Eco which are specifically sold as a low rolling resistance summer tyre!

(Which you can see here: https://www.mytyres.co.uk/cgi-bin/rshop ... p=R-342565 )

I've certainly not noticed any reduction in range compared to the old tyres, especially at 40 psi. And when I get home from work in the winter with the heater on with 5 miles of range left, every mile counts for me!
- Simon

EV: 2011 Peugeot Ion
ICE: 1997 Citroen Xantia V6

DBMandrake
Posts: 48
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2017 4:57 am
Location: Scotland

Re: What tire would you recommend?

Wed Apr 11, 2018 7:07 am

JoeS wrote:Update on the new front Blizzaks and rear Enasaves:

As I was pushing the car a bit going down my windy road last night, the ASC kicked in prematurely :shock: keeping me from applying full throttle in the curve. Guess there must be a diameter mismatch between the Blizzaks and Enasaves which is recognized by the car. :cry: This is a noticeably more sensitive response than normal, as 'normally' this occurs when one is really throwing the car into the curve. Guess this will make my tires last longer :roll: (or I can disable ASC more often :evil: ).

These cars are super sensitive to tyre size mismatches between front and rear.

When I got my new Vredestein Quatrac 5's (previous post) I actually bought the rear two first - earlier than I originally had been planning due to a non-repairable puncture in the rear left, and ran with these two new full diameter tyres at the rear and the worn original tyres at the front for a couple of months until I replaced the fronts with new tyres as well.

During this time I noticed many anomalies with the traction control system. The main symptom was that rapid acceleration on a moderate left corner would sometimes cause the traction control light to flicker on and power to be reduced when there was absolutely, definitely not any loss of traction or wheel slip occurring - it was happening even on a warm dry road with relatively moderate acceleration that would not have been causing a loss of traction.

The other symptom I noticed is that sometimes when leaving work, during the first downhill leg regenerative braking would be severely restricted for quite a period of time, then after a while it would start working. As the battery was at 60% there is no reason why regeneration should be restricted. As the traction control will cut regeneration if it detects wheel slip on ice (which I discovered in winter...) I knew that it was probably the traction control causing this due to believing that regeneration was causing wheel slip.

I continued to see both symptoms intermittently right up until the time when I replaced the front tyres as well - as soon as the proportions between front and rear tyres were matched again both symptoms went away and never returned!

So I would not recommend mixing and matching different brands of tyres between front and rear on these cars, as different brand tyres of the same nominal dimensions often have quite a big difference in rolling radius that will upset the traction control. Likewise mixing brand new tyres at one end and heavily worn tyres at the other end (reduced rolling radius) can also cause a problem, as it did with me.
- Simon

EV: 2011 Peugeot Ion
ICE: 1997 Citroen Xantia V6

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