wmcbrine
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L1 amp limits for i-MiEV?

Fri Aug 28, 2015 8:20 am

I know that the older bundled L1 EVSE only draws 8 amps, and the later model bumps that up to, what, 12? But, suppose that you had an L1 EVSE that could deliver up to 30 amps. Would the i-MiEV draw 27.5 amps, to reach its full 3.3 KW charge rate? Or is there a separate limit on current?

(Yes, I realize that the typical 120V circuit is only 15 or 20 amps. But, NEMA 5-30 and even 5-50 do exist.)

PV1
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Re: L1 amp limits for i-MiEV?

Fri Aug 28, 2015 8:27 am

I've heard the i-MiEV is limited to 16 amps, on both L1 and L2.

I've never seen mine draw more than 14 amps on any voltage; 120, 208, or 240 volts.

I remember doing the math before buying my i-MiEV, that if I could get 16 amps on 120 volts, then I wouldn't have any problems with my then current job situation. Looking back now, 12 amps would have been plenty.
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Don
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Re: L1 amp limits for i-MiEV?

Fri Aug 28, 2015 9:27 am

PV1 wrote:I've never seen mine draw more than 14 amps on any voltage; 120, 208, or 240 volts.
Same here

I'm pretty certain the wire gauge in the car limits the current to 15 or 16 amps - You'll need 240 volts to see 3.3 Kw

Don
2012 iMiEV SE Premium, White
2012 iMiEV SE, White
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jray3
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Re: L1 amp limits for i-MiEV?

Fri Aug 28, 2015 9:46 am

I'll confirm that 16 amp upper limit on L1 or L2 with our cars, and that should be the case on any multi-voltage equipment, AC or DC.

It is the amps that are limited because that electrical current flow is what heats up components. Voltage limits are a function of the insulation and isolation limits on those components. Voltage and current can be proportionately adjusted (one up and the other down, W=V*A) to achieve the same power levels, so designers pick a compromise point. One could conceivably charge a car with two tiny strands of copper connected to the 500,000 Volt Pacific DC intertie not far from me, but the equipment cost to step that 500 kV down to 330 V for my i-MiEV would be prohibitive... It would be nice to see only 10 amps of current delivering a 50 kW fast charge, though...
2012 i-SE "MR BEAN" 96,000 miles
2000 Mazda Miata EV, 78 kW, 17 kWh
1983 Grumman Kurbwatt EV,170 kW, 32 kWh
1983 Mazda RX-7 EV 43 kW 10 kWh
1971 "Karmann Eclectric" EV 240 kW 19 kWh
1965 Karmann Ghia Cabriolet

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