9h1bw
Posts: 27
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Using the battery as an emergency supply

Tue Apr 11, 2017 3:00 am

I was reading that mitshubishi marketed an emergency 200 v ac supply inverter for the Japanese market. Did it ever reach the european Market? If yes can one still buy one?

Alternatively can one source a 330 v dc to 230v ac Inverter?

I also read that one can tap the auxiliary 12v battery and attach an inverter to it. How feasible is this? How much power can one extract from the dc to dc converter?

PV1
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Re: Using the battery as an emergency supply

Tue Apr 11, 2017 5:35 am

I don't think the MiEV Powerbox (as the inverter is called) ever made it out of the Japanese market.

However, as you pointed out, we can use a 12 volt inverter attached to the 12 volt battery and use stored energy that way. The DC-DC converter in the car is rated at 80 amps, but you'd want to limit it to 60 amps or less if you're pulling power for a while. 60 amps at 12 volts is 720 watts. Considering the car's own power consumption to maintain READY mode, a full charge would last about 15 hours at that rate.

The Powerbox is capable of about 1,500 watts if you can find one, but the big unknown is if non-JDM I-MiEVs have the code to support power output through the CHAdeMO port.
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Luddite
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Location: Scotland, UK

Re: Using the battery as an emergency supply

Tue Apr 11, 2017 8:42 am

Hi All,

New user here. I just bought my ion (2011 model) 3 weeks ago.
The 12v option looks like it will work for pretty much all EVs.
Just stumbled upon this video published today -

How To Power Your House In an Emergency From Your Electric Car
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADqk4IjzjXs

Hope this helps.
..........................................................
2011 Peugeot Ion

9h1bw
Posts: 27
Joined: Sun Mar 19, 2017 2:35 am

Re: Using the battery as an emergency supply

Tue Apr 11, 2017 9:42 am

Thank you both for your informative reply.

I had a look at the Transport Evolved video you posted and it is just what I was looking for.

I do have a 1kw inverter which I use for my ham radio activities and so I do not need to invest in anything. In fact I could use my radio , with in limits, (I have to get home) during a field day (that is ham speak to operate in some field away from the grid) . It would eliminate the use of a generator. Or lugging a heavy lead acid battery.

I will have to carry out some tests to see what autonomy I can depend on.

Thanks once again.

Chris.

jray3
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Re: Using the battery as an emergency supply

Tue Apr 11, 2017 1:03 pm

One possibility to not overlook is using the i-MiEV in parallel with a larger 12V battery (or battery bank) attached to the inverter. A permanent pigtail on the i-MiEV battery using an Anderson SB50 connector rather than jumper cables does the trick. This would allow much larger intermittent loads than the 830 W or so that our DC-DC should peak at (13.8Vx60A). I just spent a week 'off-grid' on a sailboat with a 3 kW inverter, and was able to use the 120 VAC microwave, hot plate and coffee maker as desired with no more inconvenience than remembering to not use all three at once! (Onboard solar and wind kept the three Group 31 AGM batteries topped off.)
2012 i-SE "MR BEAN" 93,000 miles
2000 Mazda Miata EV, 78 kW, 17 kWh
1983 Grumman Kurbwatt EV,170 kW, 32 kWh
1983 Mazda RX-7 EV 43 kW 10 kWh
1971 "Karmann Eclectric" EV 240 kW 19 kWh
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9h1bw
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Re: Using the battery as an emergency supply

Wed Apr 12, 2017 11:52 am

That is an excellent idea and will try it. My 100 w transmitter draws 20 amps on peak. I will need to find a load that will give me the right average current consumed during duty cycle of reception and transmission and see how many hours of autonomy per notch on the fuel gauge will give me.

Regards

Chris

pbui19
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Re: Using the battery as an emergency supply

Wed Apr 12, 2017 2:02 pm

Since we live in the hills and sometimes the roads get closed; I am also planning to charge the i from the roof top solar panels when it's sunny out. Unfortunately I don't think it's possible to charge the i while in ready mode; but not a problem since it'll be day time and sunny.

Aerowhatt
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Re: Using the battery as an emergency supply

Wed Apr 12, 2017 2:17 pm

pbui19 wrote:Since we live in the hills and sometimes the roads get closed; I am also planning to charge the i from the roof top solar panels when it's sunny out. Unfortunately I don't think it's possible to charge the i while in ready mode; but not a problem since it'll be day time and sunny.


You are in luck though because during charging L1 or L2 the dc to dc converter is powered and charging the 12 volt battery under the hood. So you can pull 12 volt power off the system while it is charging too.

Aerowhatt
2014 cool silver ES, acquired new 4/2015 (42.7ah at ~26K miles)
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jray3
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Re: Using the battery as an emergency supply

Thu Apr 13, 2017 10:36 am

UPDATE- found my answer in the best resource, this here forum! (A CANbus signal is required.)
http://myimiev.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=22&t=1751

Does anyone know if our DC-DC is 'turned on' via a CANbus command, or is it simply connected downstream of a relay, such that it only sees HV input when the car is charging or turned on? I'm interested in using salvaged i-MiEV dc-dc in other applications. (but haven't done my own research yet by studying the wiring diagrams) :roll:

Seattle EV Assoc had a presentation this week from Craig Smith of http://opengarages.org/handbook/ , in which it came up that Teslas prior to a certain build date only turned their DC-DC on via CANbus commands, but since that time have energized any time they see a HV input, making them more DIY-sirable
2012 i-SE "MR BEAN" 93,000 miles
2000 Mazda Miata EV, 78 kW, 17 kWh
1983 Grumman Kurbwatt EV,170 kW, 32 kWh
1983 Mazda RX-7 EV 43 kW 10 kWh
1971 "Karmann Eclectric" EV 240 kW 19 kWh
1965 Karmann Ghia Cabriolet

pbui19
Posts: 142
Joined: Tue Jan 07, 2014 12:17 pm

Re: Using the battery as an emergency supply

Fri Apr 14, 2017 7:12 am

Aerowhatt wrote:
You are in luck though because during charging L1 or L2 the dc to dc converter is powered and charging the 12 volt battery under the hood. So you can pull 12 volt power off the system while it is charging too.

Aerowhatt


would the i have to be in non-ready mode ? i believe L1/L2 charging only occurs in off ? Thanks for the tip by the way.

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