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Re: Future battery replacement

Posted: Sun Apr 16, 2017 7:24 am
by Aerowhatt
I would think that perhaps the best place to look for replacement battery would be to Tesla's Powerwall2. They are using the new 2170 cells that they are making in Nevada. At $5,500.00 for 14 kWh, I haven't found anything less expensive by far. I have not been able to find out how they are configured though. What is the DC voltage of the package??

If one is paying for labor to custom build a pack (or cells) and using quality 18650's to do it. It will most likely cost more than Mitsu replacement cost. and the Mitsu pack would presumably have a warranty. I think "future" is the key word here.

Aerowhatt

Re: Future battery replacement

Posted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 7:30 am
by blackheart
Any hope that this would be a real solution in the not so near future?
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/next/tech/super-safe-glass-battery-charges-in-minutes-not-hours/

I'm hoping for one step closer to dilithium crystals for my imiev ;-)

Re: Future battery replacement

Posted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 8:34 am
by PV1
I wonder what the weight difference is compared to lithium ion.

While energy density increases are always helpful, does anyone else find the charge time claims almost pointless? With Gen2 EV battery packs in the 50-60 kWh range, <1 hour recharge time isn't going to make much difference when the charger can't push enough current to take advantage of the cell's rapid recharge ability. A 50 kW quick charger would still take over an hour to charge up a Bolt, even at full output. A Supercharger, without tapering, would take nearly an hour to recharge a Model S P100D. The issue, more with larger packs than smaller, is the ability to get power to the battery, not the battery taking it in. Our i-MiEVs, on the other hand, suffer cell limits rather early on in a quick charge, but a full charge on a DCQC can still be accomplished in about an hour. But the trend in EVs is larger packs, not smaller.

What's the story is regarding his last name (Goodenough)?

Re: Future battery replacement

Posted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 12:51 pm
by Aerowhatt
PV1 wrote:I wonder what the weight difference is compared to lithium ion.

While energy density increases are always helpful, does anyone else find the charge time claims almost pointless? With Gen2 EV battery packs in the 50-60 kWh range, <1 hour recharge time isn't going to make much difference when the charger can't push enough current to take advantage of the cell's rapid recharge ability. A 50 kW quick charger would still take over an hour to charge up a Bolt, even at full output. A Supercharger, without tapering, would take nearly an hour to recharge a Model S P100D. The issue, more with larger packs than smaller, is the ability to get power to the battery, not the battery taking it in. Our i-MiEVs, on the other hand, suffer cell limits rather early on in a quick charge, but a full charge on a DCQC can still be accomplished in about an hour. But the trend in EVs is larger packs, not smaller.


Agreed charge time claims are pretty pointless.

However large packs I think are a good idea. Imagine a +250 mile range pack that the BMS balanced at from 65 to 70% SOC instead of only near 100%. Then the RR shows ~100 miles and goes turtle at 20% to 25% SOC. Call this "default mode". Then "Trip Mode" (selectable when starting charging and auto reverting to "default mode" at the next charge) would use a discharge profile and limits and top end balancing just like our EV's do today. So you have a highway trip capable EV (with "default mode") that normally has local commuter range. Which on a day to day basis balances the cells and uses the battery in it's highest longevity range of SOC. Likely a 20 year old car with the original battery and 180 miles of trip range remaining would result. Sort of like a Volt without the gas. Plus with the really deep "turtle range" one should never require a tow truck. Even if you really screwed up your planning.

Aerowhatt

Re: Future battery 16KWH replacement

Posted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 5:34 pm
by jeffcarroll78s2
If one only owns one vehicle, a large pack is ideal. Personally, My imiev takes me to the office daily, is taken with us on camping trips, and very often is used to haul 8' long construction materials. Many pick-up trucks can't do that! Tesla has called me several times, and my response has always been the same:
" When you make a (4) door car that weighs 2500lbs or less (ideal weight for towing long distance), is as efficient as the i, recharges on any electric service or receptacle in the US, costs $16K and cost nothing more than the price of tires to maintain, give me call!
I wouldn't change anything, about the battery size or get into paralling small cells. Series strings, of 50A cells, are ideal for many reasons. The KISS principle applies. Tesla owners will be in for a surprise when their vehicles are out of warranty, and things start going wrong. I have the equipment and ability to repair or replace the pack in the i...Very few Tesla owners will be capable of this. "Man's got to know his Limitations"!

Jeff in Cincy

Re: Future battery replacement

Posted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 3:25 pm
by jray3
http://insideevs.com/gs-yuasa-promises-range-doubling-ev-battery-by-2020/

Getting a 120 mile replacement battery (with a Mitsu warranty :roll: ) around 2020-2022 would do very nicely to stretch out MR BEAN's car-eer. At that point he'll be past 120,000 miles, so capacity degradation should be noticeable. Plus, my eldest gets her license to drive in 2022, and I'm not sure which is better, a 50 mile leash plus Daddy's Tow Service, or a battery that she can thrash all the way to Seattle and back... I'm leaning towards the leash. 16 year olds have no business going into the big city without a chaperone! One thing's for sure, she's in love with MR BEAN and I doubt there will be whining for something 'better' when the time comes..

Re: Future battery replacement

Posted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 7:13 am
by Phximiev
The question is whether it would fit the iMiev.